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In the Russian tradition, the kamilavka is a stiff cylindrical hat, covered in velvet and expanding outwardly towards the top.  A black kamilavka is worn by monastic deacons during the divine services.  A purple kamilavka, awarded to married deacons and priests as a mark of distinction, is worn in formal non-liturgical settings and during the divine services.  In the Russian tradition the right to wear the kamilavka is the third and highest liturgical award for a deacon, and the third liturgical award for a priest.

The nabedrennik is a rectangular vestment, suspended from the corners on the upper short side by a long ribbon and worn by priests over the right thigh.  The nabedrennik has a cross in the middle.  In the Russian tradition, the right to wear the nabedrennik is the first liturgical award for a priest.  When vesting with it the priest says: “Gird Thy sword upon Thy thigh, O Mighty One, in Thy comeliness and Thy Beauty, and bend Thy bow, and proceed prosperously, and be king, because of truth and meekness and righteousness, and Thy right hand shall guide Thee wondrously, always, now and ever, and unto the ages of ages. Amen.” (Psalm 44:3)  When the right to wear the palitsa is awarded, the nabedrennik is worn over the left thigh.

In the Russian tradition, the skufiya is a soft brimless cap constructed of four panels.  It may be made of a lightweight fabric such as cotton or linen or a heavier fabric such as velvet.  A black skufiya may be worn by monastics and by deacons, priests, and bishops when a head covering is required in a non-liturgical setting.  A purple skufiya, awarded to married priests as a mark of distinction, is worn in non-liturgical settings, and will also be worn during the divine services until the right to wear the kamilavka is granted.  The right to wear the purple skufiya is the second liturgical award for a priest.

The pectoral cross is a large cross suspended on a chain and worn on the chest.  In the Russian tradition, priests wear the pectoral cross in non-liturgical settings and during the divine services.  They are presented with a silver cross upon ordination; the right to wear the gold cross and the jewelled cross is granted as an award.  The gold cross is the fourth liturgical award for a priest and the jewelled cross is the sixth.

The palitsa is a diamond-shaped vestment, suspended from one corner by a long ribbon and worn by priests over the right thigh.  The palitsa generally has a cross in the middle but may also be embroidered with an icon.  In the Russian tradition, the right to wear the palitsa is the fifth liturgical award for a priest.

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